Founded in 1846 by Joseph Werner, a German immigrant., the town of Newport was located several miles east of Riverside in Walker County. The settlement served as a Trinity River port and had its heyday in the late 1850s. Several homes, businesses, and a post office operated at the site, but the arrival of the railroad in the 1870s reduced river traffic and led to the decline of the town. It disappeared from regional maps by the mid-1880s. But, a historical marker was established at the Werner Cemetery in 1936 to commemorate the town and its inhabitants.

Images

Newport Historical Marker
Werner Cemetery - 1846
Captain Joseph Werner family Captain Joseph Newport and family, Newport, 1899. Born in Prussia in 1820 he founded the town of Newport. The Texas Centennial Marker, placed here in 1936, states that Newport was founded in 1846 by Captain Joseph Werner, but decedents and historians agree that the Werners were probably not in Walker County until 1852 or 1853 at the earliest. In 1868 Captain Joe bought some land adjoining the old Newport property. Werner died January 2, 1872, and was given a Masonic burial in the Newport cemetery with J. P. Barners officiating. Source: Walker County Treasures
Newport fireplace ruins Source: Walker County Treasures
Ruins of the old Newport community. Newport ruins. The town of Newport, on the west bank of the Trinity River, about six miles downriver from Riverside,was founded by Joseph Werner, an immigrant from Frankfurt, Prussia, around 1853-1854. The town depended on the river trade for its livelihood, and at one time Newport boasted 200 inhabitants, a post office, a school, a general store, a tannery, a wood shop and a blacksmith shop. After the death of Joseph Werner and the coming of the railroad in 1872, the community declined as people and businesses moved upriver to the Riverside railroad junction. Source: Walker County Treasurers

Location

Werner Cemetery, off Newport Village Road (on private land)

Metadata

Jami Horne and Briana Weaver, “Newport,” East Texas History, accessed September 30, 2022, https://easttexashistory.org/items/show/175.