Ima Hogg, a collector of American antiques, and architect John Staub collaborated on the mansion's design, combining elements from southern plantations, the Spanish creole architecture of Louisiana, and 18th century Georgian architecture.…

The Fredonian Rebellion was a brief and unsuccessful uprising which, nevertheless, had a profound influence on Texas history. The primary mover behind the rebellion was Haden Edwards, the empresario of Nacogdoches from 1825 to 1826, who was in…

On May 12, 1865, two small outfits of soldiers would engage in what is now considered the final battle of the Civil War. Though the war had officially ended with General Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox more than a month before, Union forces…

On September 8, 1863, four Union gunboats and 4,000 troops attacked Fort Griffin, a Confederate position controlling the Sabine River Pass, which divides Texas from Louisiana on the Gulf Coast. The Union was intent upon the conquest of Texas, which…

Professional baseball began as a collection of company teams in the newly industrialized northeast of the 19th century, and through most of the 20th century the pride of industrial cities often stemmed from the exploits of the local team. Houston, as…

The highest ranking Texan in the Confederate government, John Henninger Reagan, proved to be a crucial figure in nineteenth century politics. A leading Texas Democrat, he served not only as Postmaster General of the Confederacy, but also as a United…

Combat operations during World War II occurred far away from the United States, mostly on distant Pacific isles or in European villages. However, a piece of World War II history did happen right here in East Texas. The United States held nearly half…

In 1860, Galveston served as a thriving island port and major commercial hub on the Texas gulf coast. With a population of roughly 7,200, it was the largest city in Texas and was responsible for three-quarters of the state's seaborne cotton exports.…

Born on July 10, 1882, to James and Sarah Hogg in Mineola, Texas, Ima Hogg watched her father rise to the pinnacle of Texas politics before turning his hand to business. She became the lady of the house at thirteen, following her mother’s early…

From the 1930s until the 1950s the Diboll Dragons contributed to the entertainment and community pride of the African American population of Diboll. Southern Pine Lumber Company drove the creation and growth of Diboll, establishing the town's schools…

During World II, Nazis not only threatened Europe, but held some influence in East Texas where thousands of prisoners of war (POWs) were held. During the war, the United States held nearly half a million Axis POWs and Texas housed roughly ten percent…

Born in Virginia in 1807, John Bankhead Magruder rose to prominence in the early days of the American Civil War. A notable commander in Virginia, he cemented his place in history with his performance at the Second Battle of Galveston in January…

"If it takes a few days in jail to get equality, I feel it's worth it. I feel that's the least I can do," 19-year-old Mattie Mae Etta Johnson wrote in a letter to her parents shortly after her release from the Marshall jail. The Bishop College junior…

In September 1863, Sabine Pass, the southernmost point of the border between Texas and Louisiana, saw a battle that could best be summarized as unusual. More than 20 warships loaded with dozens of guns and thousands of trained seamen and soldiers…

James Leonard Farmer, Jr., one of the major leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, said that his experiences as a young college student in segregated Marshall led him to "participate in a movement that would try to bring about change." Born in…

No longer standing, the Sheppard-Watts Hospital served the health and medical needs of Marshall's African American community for more than 40 years. East Texas native James R. Sheppard, M.D., opened the Sheppard Sanitarium, as the hospital was first…

Imperial Sugar Company is the oldest extant business in Texas. Started in 1843 in Sugar Land, a place named for the product the company processes, the company's changing ownership marked its early history. In the 1840s, Nathaniel F. Williams…

As one of the nation's largest urban areas and ports, Houston is home to the 68th highest crime rate in the U.S. The Houston Police Department is the primary police force in the Houston area. In 1841, the growing crime issue in Houston necessitated…

In June 1927, W.T. Carter, Jr. opened an airfield named after himself through his company, Houston Airport Corporation. Ten years later the City of Houston, using federal Public Works Administration funds, purchased W.T. Carter Field and renamed it…

Two enterprising brothers, Augustus and John Allen, came to Texas from New York in 1832 to make their fortunes through land speculation. After failing to offer enough money for Clopper’s point (present day Morgan’s Point), and hoping to avoid any…

Lasting only eighteen minutes, the Battle of San Jacinto was the definitive ending to Mexico’s control of its northernmost province of Tejas y Coahuila and the birth of the Republic of Texas. Starting around four o’clock in the afternoon,…

Established in 1881 by the American Baptist Home Mission Society, Bishop College was named in honor of Nathan Bishop, a white attorney and Society board member who supported the creation of a Baptist college for African Americans in Texas. The…

The building located at 813 Congress has at various times housed a trading post, stage stop, coffeehouse, slave market, and bakery. It currently is home to the La Carafe Bar. It was built in 1860 after a fire destroyed the original 1847 wooden…

Today the former site of the Houston prisoner of war camp is located on the site of a younger though historical building in its own right, the Merchant and Manufacturer’s building. If not for a state historical marker placed in 1965, there would…

On any given day, one may have to stop for the rare chicken who has wandered its way onto the road from the Sam Houston Memorial Museum. The grounds that the chickens call home rest on fifteen acres of the original 200 acre farm owned by General Sam…

Located in Huntsville, Texas, the Sam Houston Memorial Museum and attached grounds are spread across eighteen acres of the original two hundred-plus acres once owned by Sam Houston and family from 1847 to 1858. Preservation of this historic site…

One of the most important centers at the Houston home was the kitchen. A simple, single, large wooden room with a stone fireplace in the back, the kitchen served as the location for preparing food, washing clothes, soap making, animal butchering,…

Margaret Moffette Lea was born on April 11, 1819, on her family’s farm near Marion, Alabama, to Temple and Nancy Lea. At fifteen, her father passed away. After that her family moved into town taking up residence in the home of Henry Lea,…

Following his military service in the War of 1812 and a stint as a sub-Indian agent to the Cherokees, Sam Houston moved to Nashville, Tennessee, in March 1818 to read law under the direction of Judge James Trimble. It took Houston just six months to…